Dog Legislation Council of Canada

Our website has moved to www.dlcc.ca

Our blog has moved to wagthedog.dlcc.ca

BITE PREVENTION

We must teach and educate our children how to properly interact with dogs. Education is the key to bite prevention!

Recently in the media, specifically by one reporter from the Toronto Sun, believers of the above statement have taken some flack. So we're taking a small bit of opportunity to both defend our belief and to help educate anyone who reads this page.

We spend many of our early teachings with our children teaching them right from wrong, safe from unsafe and all the do's and do not's. We teach our children how to cross the road safely, not to talk to strangers, and how to call 9-1-1 in an emergency.

Why shouldn't we teach them how to approach dogs in general?

Considering the Canadian Safety Council estimates that in 70% of dog bite cases the victim knew the dog, and of that 25% lived in the house with the offending dog.

Parents MUST teach their children, of all ages, how to respect their own family dog, and how to approach a strange dog.

Two helpful files: Dog Bite Prevention and Dog Bite Prevention Service Providers



HELPFUL HINTS TO REMEMBER AS PARENTS AND TEACH YOUR CHILD

Family Dog

  • NEVER disturb a dog who is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies.
  • NEVER pet a dog, even your own, without letting him see and sniff you first.

Dog WITH Owner

  • Children must always ASK PERMISSION from the owner and their parents BEFORE petting any dog.
  • If the owner CANNOT control the dog and have it SIT nicely for the child to pet, SAY THANK YOU AND WALK AWAY

Dogs in their own yard

  • NEVER approach a dog who is confined behind a fence, within a car, or on a chain.
  • NEVER TEASE any dog by poking at them through fences or car windows or reaching your arm through to pet them.

Dogs WITHOUT an owner

  • NEVER approach a dog you don't know or a dog who is alone without his owner.
  • NEVER RUN away from any dog chasing. STOP, STAND STILL, REMAIN CALM, ARMS AT YOUR SIDES, DO NOT SCREAM, AND WALK AWAY SLOWLY FACING THE DOG BUT NOT STARING AT THEM
  • If a dog attacks, "feed" him your jacket, purse, bicycle, or anything else that you can get between you and the dog.

For more information from the DLCC about dog bite safety, please contact:
LeeAnn O'Reilly

Please contact the Wolf Inside The Dog for any assistance in providing your community or organization with a dogbite safety program.